Saturday, February 5, 2011

The dead Flyer

Manning our 'Birds', day and night
Risking it all, in every flight
Armed with wings made of gold
shining now is that star in the night

Men who flew, flew far and wide
Men who flew, did that with pride
In peace and war, they made us proud
and made us cry, when they died

Review of SANCTUM

3D has become such a clich├ęd feature these days that I had decided to give every 3D film a miss, primarily due to the manner in which the technology is used purely as a tool to accessorize the film rather than really add any cinematic value to it. But when it’s the iconic James Cameroon who’s involved in a project, could I say no.

First of all, a film about diving can only be appreciated by a layman, if a brief introduction is given about the entire process. Despite being familiar with diving, I found the initial part of the film difficult to follow due to the needlessly cheeky dialogues and lack of emphasis on essential exposition.

The 3D feature is well used in several sections in the film and one is exposed to the world of cave diving and the dangers involved therein. But when a film is supposed to celebrate human spirit and endurance, it should be more than just a one dimensional visual spectacle. This is where the film loses out. The characters are sketchy and behave in strange whimsical manner. You could have well been playing a 3D video game or watching a B grade action affair, as often key moments in the film are bereft of any real emotion. There is little empathy one feels for the cast when they are faced with life and death situations. The moments that give you the creep come far and few between. The chemistry between the various actors seems as shallow as the story itself.

In the end, one leaves the theatre with not one enduring memory of this rather emotionally bland affair. This is accentuated when one compares it to a similar film on outdoors, 127 hours, released two weeks ago. 3.0 STARS